Health Office

Incorporated in our site is information specific to the individual schools, various forms you may need and periodic health updates shared by our school doctors/medical directors.

Our Health Offices are busy places.  There are many reasons why children come to visit us.  These include medical reasons, as well as reasons that are psychological or emotional. The latter may include academic stresses, family related issues (including divorce and family sicknesses), social/peer problems, or even the demise of a beloved family pet.  Good communication, between the Health Office and the home, is critical in making your student's school day as pleasant and educationally productive as possible.

Thank you for keeping us abreast of anything you feel may affect your child at school.  We care for all of our students, and when we work closely together, our goal of making each and every day a successful one can be more adequately achieved.

Our School Nurses

Elementary Schools

Douglas Grafflin:
Danielle Bonsignore   238-7204 x5104   dabonsignore@ccsd.ws

Roaring Brook:
Suzanne Rota   238-7205 x6104   surota@ccsd.ws

Westorchard:
Astrid Jarzembowski   238-7206 x7104   asjarzembowski@ccsd.ws
 

Middle Schools

Robert E. Bell:
Pat Pollock   238-7202 x3104   papollock@ccsd.ws

Seven Bridges:
Lorie Miano   238-7203 x4104   lomiano@ccsd.ws
 

High School

Horace Greeley:
Kathy Brehm   238-7201 x2104   kabrehm@ccsd.ws
Christina Ahern   238-7201 x2133  chahern@ccsd.ws
 
 

Informational Health Material

Elementary Schools

Winter Wear

With cold weather upon us, parents are likely to have questions about
keeping their children healthy and safe this winter. Here are some health tips based on guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  • Make sure your child dresses in layers. There is warm air between each layer of clothing that helps maintain body temperature.
  • Have your child wear wool. Wool keeps a person drier and warmer than many other fabrics. Your child can wear long underwear under the garment if the wool is irritating. Also, for our purposes, snow pants are a must to play in snow during recess.
  • Pay special attention to hands and feet by wearing gloves and sock liners. Mittens hold in more heat than gloves.
  • Make sure your child always wears a hat when the temperature is below freezing. Most body heat is lost through an uncovered head.
  • A scarf helps protect the face against frostbite and wind burn.
  • Have your child wear boots while playing in the snow. Toes are more prone to frostbite than other body parts.
  • To prevent chapping caused by cold air that hits moist areas of your child’s face— from runny noses or drooling— apply petroleum jelly to exposed areas of the face.

Winter: Elementary philosophy letter to parents

Dear Parents,
It is our District’s philosophy that outdoor recess is an important part of an elementary child’s school day. It is an opportunity to enjoy physical activity, as well as being an invaluable tool in the development of socialization skills. Our rule of thumb is that children go outside if the temperature is above 20 degrees (including the wind-chill factor). We would like to ask for your help in making outdoor recess a safe and comfortable experience.
At this time please spend a few minutes speaking to your child about appropriate playground behavior. The throwing of snowballs is a favorite for children but it can be very dangerous. Please remind your children that this activity is not allowed at school.
Also, in the winter months, it is extremely important that parents pay special attention to the outer clothing worn to school by their children. It is essential that each child have a winter jacket, a hat, and gloves or mittens. When snow is on the ground, boots and snow pants are mandatory for outdoor play. Please refer to the reverse side of this page for an article entitled “Winter Wear”. This will provide you with additional hints on ways to keep your child well protected from the cold temperatures.
With your cooperation, the children will thoroughly enjoy the beautiful outdoors and the camaraderie of good friends. Thank you for your assistance.

Physical Education /Recess: Notes Needed for Limiting Activity

There are times that students need to be excused from physical education class. These may be either injury related or illness related. If your child cannot participate in physical education, please follow the guidelines below:

  • Please have your child bring any health related note to the teacher. The teacher will then share this with the Health Office. Ask your child to do this in the morning so that the PE teacher can be made aware of any limitations before the gym class commences.
  • A parent note will suffice for a period of one week.
  • A doctor’s note is required for a child who needs to be excused for a period of more than one week.
  • When a child has suffered a fracture and has been casted, a doctor’s note is necessary to notify us when participation in physical education is again allowable and appropriate. After the cast removal, activity is often restricted for a period of time.
  • Both parent and doctors’ notes must be specific in regard to the level of participation (if any) which is permissible. It is also necessary to have a specific date on which full participation is again allowed.
  • When a child is excused from physical education class, this also impacts activity at scheduled recess times. Children can, many times, go outside to breath in the fresh air, but must be reminded to be self-directed in regard to his/her specific limitations.

Seasonal Flu Guide

Keep your kids safe. Get their seasonal flu shots every fall or winter.

Is seasonal flu more serious for kids?
Infants and young children are at a greater risk for getting seriously ill from the flu. That’s why the New York State Department of Health recommends that all children 6 months and older get the seasonal flu vaccine.

Flu vaccine may save your child’s life.
Most people with seasonal flu are sick for about a week, and then they feel better. But, some people, especially young children, pregnant women, older people, and people with chronic health problems can get very sick. Some can even die. A flu vaccine is the best way to protect your child from seasonal flu.

What is seasonal flu?
The flu, or influenza, is a viral infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. The flu can spread from person to person.

Flu shot or nasal spray vaccine?

  • Flu shots can be given to children 6 months and older.
  • A nasal-spray vaccine can be given to healthy children 2 years and older.
  • Children younger than 5 years who have experienced wheezing in the past year – or any child with chronic health problems – should get the flu shot, not the nasal-spray vaccine.
  • Children younger than 9 years old who get a vaccine for the first time need two doses.

How else can I protect my child?

  • Get the seasonal flu vaccine for yourself.
  • Encourage your child’s close contacts to get seasonal flu vaccine, too. This is very important if your child is younger than 5 or if he or she has a chronic health problem such as asthma (breathing disease) or diabetes (high blood sugar levels).
  • Wash your hands often and cover your coughs and sneezes. This will prevent the spread of germs.
  • Tell your children to:
    • Stay away from people who are sick;
    • Clean their hands often;
    • Keep their hands away from their face, and
    • Cover coughs and sneezes to protect others. It’s best to use a tissue and quickly throw it away. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands.

What are signs of the flu?
The flu comes on suddenly. Most people with the flu feel very tired and have a high fever, headache, dry cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, and sore muscles. Some people, especially children, may also have stomach problems and diarrhea. The cough can last two or more weeks.

How does the flu spread?
People who have the flu usually cough, sneeze, and have a runny nose. The droplets in a cough, sneeze or runny nose contain the flu virus. Other people can get the flu by breathing in these droplets or by getting them in their nose or mouth.

How long can a sick person spread the flu to others?
Most healthy adults may be able to spread the flu from one day before getting sick to up to 5 days after getting sick. This can be longer in children and in people who don’t fight disease as well (people with weaker immune systems).

What should I use to clean hands?
Wash your children’s hands with soap and water. Wash them for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice. If soap and water are not handy, use wipes or gels with alcohol in them unless they are visibly soiled. The gels should be rubbed into hands until the hands are dry.

What can I do if my child gets sick?
Make sure your child gets plenty of rest and drinks lots of fluids. Talk with your child’s doctor before giving your child over-the-counter medicine. If your children or teenagers may have the flu, never give them aspirin or medicine that has aspirin in it. It could cause serious problems.

Can my child go to school/day care with the flu?
No. If your child has the flu, he or she should stay home to rest. This helps avoid giving the flu to other children.

When can my child go back to school/ day care after having the flu?
Children with the flu should be isolated in the home, away from other people. They should also stay home until they are symptom-free for 24 hours (that is, until they have no fever without the use of fever-control medicines and they feel well for 24 hours.) Remind your child to protect others by covering his or her mouth when coughing or sneezing. You may want to send your child to school with some tissues, wipes or gels with alcohol in them if the school allows gels.

For more information about the flu, visit
http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/influenza/seasonal/
Or
www.cdc.gov/flu

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
State of New York
Department of Health


2423 10/10

 

When Your Child is Sick at School

Children will often leave the house in the morning and, to your knowledge, are absolutely fine. Upon arrival, however, or during the course of the school day, things sometimes change. When a child comes to the Health Office during the school day, he/she is assessed. A temperature is taken and in “borderline” situations the child may rest here and be observed for a period of time. Parents are called for pick up if it is determined that your child is ill and/or may be contagious.
Sometimes it is the teacher who may be the first to notice that a child is lethargic and “just not him/herself”. These referrals are taken seriously as it is the teacher, in the school setting, who knows the normal demeanor of his/her children. The teacher sees the students each day and knows what is “normal” for an individual student. A ‘red flag” is raised when a student who is normally vivacious and conversational, becomes sluggish and disengaged.
If it is determined that your child is truly sick or “coming down with something”, you will be called. Please make sure your phone numbers are accurate and current.

When Your Child is Injured at School

When an injury occurs at school, the school nurse’s assessment skills are called upon. The majority of Health Office recess/physical education visits require an initial cleaning and a follow-up band aid and/or ice pack. Occasionally, however, an injury is more involved and may require a trip to the doctor or the emergency room. In these cases a parent or guardian is called. It is very important that your emergency phone numbers are accurate and up to date. Please supply us with all your contact numbers- home, cells, and work numbers. Back up numbers (in case we are unable to reach you) should be persons who are local. These numbers should also belong to persons that have been contacted previously and have expressed to you their willingness to assume this responsibility.

When Your Child Needs Medication at School

Students may, at times, need medication at school. This may be on a regular daily basis or on an “as needed” basis. Medication, which is given during the school hours, must always be accompanied by a medical authorization form. The form is available in the Health Office and also can be downloaded from this site. It requires the signature of both a parent and the prescribing physician.
Medications need to be delivered to the Health Office by the parent and must be in the original pharmacy container. This applies both to prescription and over-the-counter medications.
Please call your student’s Health Office with any questions.

When to keep your sick Child home

At this time of year, many children (and adults) suffer from one or more of the many symptoms associated with the “common cold” and flu. These upper respiratory and gastrointestinal complaints leave many of us with the question, “How sick should my child be to stay home from school?” Although there is no concrete answer, there are some guidelines that may help you in the decision making process.

Please keep your child home if he/she has:

  • Fever--- A child needs to be fever-free for 24 hours (without medication) in order to return to school.
  • Severe Cough--- This pertains to a cough that is so severe that he/she is unable to attend to tasks or concentrate in the classroom.
  • Purulent (yellow or green) nasal discharge--- This may be indicative of an infection.
  • Communicable disease--- These conditions include the flu, staph and strep infections, impetigo, and conjunctivitis or pink eye.
  • Nausea and vomiting--- If your child has vomited during the night or in the early morning, your child should not come to school that day.
  • Fatigue--- Early bedtime is a must for young growing bodies. If a child has been ill, his/her resistance is low. By returning too early, your child will be exposing him/herself to other children’s germs as well as exposing other children and the staff. Please keep your child home if he/she is sick.

 Also, please reinforce preventive techniques at home. Frequent hand washing is the most important method of reducing cross contamination and preventing spread of infection. Also encourage children to cover their coughs and sneezes with tissues or, alternatively, encourage them to cough into the inside of their elbows. If your child is “iffy” and you decide to send him/her to school, please make sure that he/she knows where you will be and how to reach you.

Forms

Middle Schools

Seasonal Flu Guide

Keep your kids safe. Get their seasonal flu shots every fall or winter.

Is seasonal flu more serious for kids?
Infants and young children are at a greater risk for getting seriously ill from the flu. That’s why the New York State Department of Health recommends that all children 6 months and older get the seasonal flu vaccine.

Flu vaccine may save your child’s life.
Most people with seasonal flu are sick for about a week, and then they feel better. But, some people, especially young children, pregnant women, older people, and people with chronic health problems can get very sick. Some can even die. A flu vaccine is the best way to protect your child from seasonal flu.

What is seasonal flu?
The flu, or influenza, is a viral infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. The flu can spread from person to person.

Flu shot or nasal spray vaccine?

  • Flu shots can be given to children 6 months and older.
  • A nasal-spray vaccine can be given to healthy children 2 years and older.
  • Children younger than 5 years who have experienced wheezing in the past year – or any child with chronic health problems – should get the flu shot, not the nasal-spray vaccine.
  • Children younger than 9 years old who get a vaccine for the first time need two doses.

How else can I protect my child?

  • Get the seasonal flu vaccine for yourself.
  • Encourage your child’s close contacts to get seasonal flu vaccine, too. This is very important if your child is younger than 5 or if he or she has a chronic health problem such as asthma (breathing disease) or diabetes (high blood sugar levels).
  • Wash your hands often and cover your coughs and sneezes. This will prevent the spread of germs.
  • Tell your children to:
    • Stay away from people who are sick;
    • Clean their hands often;
    • Keep their hands away from their face, and
    • Cover coughs and sneezes to protect others. It’s best to use a tissue and quickly throw it away. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands.

What are signs of the flu?
The flu comes on suddenly. Most people with the flu feel very tired and have a high fever, headache, dry cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, and sore muscles. Some people, especially children, may also have stomach problems and diarrhea. The cough can last two or more weeks.

How does the flu spread?
People who have the flu usually cough, sneeze, and have a runny nose. The droplets in a cough, sneeze or runny nose contain the flu virus. Other people can get the flu by breathing in these droplets or by getting them in their nose or mouth.

How long can a sick person spread the flu to others?
Most healthy adults may be able to spread the flu from one day before getting sick to up to 5 days after getting sick. This can be longer in children and in people who don’t fight disease as well (people with weaker immune systems).

What should I use to clean hands?
Wash your children’s hands with soap and water. Wash them for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice. If soap and water are not handy, use wipes or gels with alcohol in them unless they are visibly soiled. The gels should be rubbed into hands until the hands are dry.

What can I do if my child gets sick?
Make sure your child gets plenty of rest and drinks lots of fluids. Talk with your child’s doctor before giving your child over-the-counter medicine. If your children or teenagers may have the flu, never give them aspirin or medicine that has aspirin in it. It could cause serious problems.

Can my child go to school/day care with the flu?
No. If your child has the flu, he or she should stay home to rest. This helps avoid giving the flu to other children.

When can my child go back to school/ day care after having the flu?
Children with the flu should be isolated in the home, away from other people. They should also stay home until they are symptom-free for 24 hours (that is, until they have no fever without the use of fever-control medicines and they feel well for 24 hours.) Remind your child to protect others by covering his or her mouth when coughing or sneezing. You may want to send your child to school with some tissues, wipes or gels with alcohol in them if the school allows gels.

For more information about the flu, visit
http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/influenza/seasonal/
Or
www.cdc.gov/flu

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
State of New York
Department of Health


2423 10/10

When Your Child Needs Medication at School

Students may, at times, need medication at school. This may be on a regular daily basis or on an “as needed” basis. Medication, which is given during the school hours, must always be accompanied by a medical authorization form. The form is available in the Health Office and also can be downloaded from this site. It requires the signature of both a parent and the prescribing physician.
Medications need to be delivered to the Health Office by the parent and must be in the original pharmacy container. This applies both to prescription and over-the-counter medications.
Please call your student’s Health Office with any questions.

Concussion Management Policy

5032
Concussion Management Policy


Introduction
School athletic programs, intramural sports and physical education classes are an important part of the educational experience in the Chappaqua Central School District. It is paramount that the Board of Education insures that these experiences are as safe as possible for our student athletes. We recognize that mild traumatic brain injuries, also referred to as concussions, in young people can have long-term, substantial and devastating impacts. The District shall establish guidelines in an effort to protect our students and reduce the risk of long-term health complications.


Concussion Management Team
The District shall establish a Concussion Management Team consisting of the Director of Physical Education and Athletics, the School District's Medical Directors, a School Nurse, and the Athletic Trainer. The team shall oversee the implementation of any regulations approved by the Superintendent of Schools, including the training of staff, the provision of information to parents, and the utilization of technology, including baseline neurocognitive testing.


Removal from Athletic Activities
Any pupil believed to have sustained or who has sustained a traumatic brain injury will be immediately removed from athletic activities. If there is any doubt as to whether a student has sustained a concussion, it shall be presumed that he/she has until proven otherwise. No student shall resume athletic activity until he/she has been symptom free for at least 24 hours and has been evaluated by and received written and signed authorization from a licensed physician or licensed neurologist.


No student will be allowed to return to play on the same day of a concussion, regardless of the circumstances and shall be made aware that concussions may cause lifetime impairments. Student-athletes who have suffered from multiple concussions during a season will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Those with two (2) concussions will require additional rest and may be held out for the season. Those suffering three (3) concussions in a school year will be disqualified from participating in contact and collision sports until cleared by a neurologist.


For the safety of the student-athlete, the School District reserves the right under New York State Law to ban an athlete from competition regardless of medical clearance. Should a dispute arise the School Medical Directors have the authority to make the final decision on an athlete's return to play.

Training
On a biennial basis, all school coaches, physical education teachers, nurses and athletic trainers shall receive training on recognizing the symptoms of concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries, how such injuries may occur, how to prevent them, and how to implement the guidelines for a student's return to play. Coaches shall be required to meet with team members at the commencement of each season to discuss  the signs and symptoms of concussions and the importance of reporting any such symptoms immediately to the appropriate staff.


Concussion Information and Permission Forms
Head injury information, including return to school and school activities guidelines and the district's Return to Play guidelines, will be included in the interscholastic sports information and any permission forms given to students signing up for sports.


Adopted by Board of Education March 20,2012

KI Fact Sheet

Potassium Iodide (KI) Questions & Answers
 
What is Potassium Iodide (KI)?  Potassium Iodide is a simple mineral salt that can help prevent thyroid cancer in a nuclear accident that releases radioactive iodine.  KI does not protect any part of the body other than the thyroid.
 
Why is there interest in KI today? Nuclear power plant accidents may release radioactive iodine and other radioactive substances and taking KI may help protect you from absorbing radioactive iodine into your thyroid.  The best action in an emergency is to carefully listen to and follow directions from public officials.  The officials will utilize Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio and Television stations, press releases and news briefings to broadcast instructions and information which may include directions to take KI; to evacuate a particular area; to shelter in place if you cannot evacuate; or to take no action.  You should stay tuned for more information and updates.  If ordered to evacuate, you should not delay evacuation while trying to locate or purchase KI.
 
How effective is the use of KI?  KI is most effective when taken within two to four hours of an exposure to radioactive iodine.  It is less effective when taken earlier or later than that.  KI effectively “floods” the thyroid with “good iodine,” to block absorption of any radioactive iodine.  This may reduce the risk of thyroid cancer in individuals who breathe or swallow radioactive iodine.   
 
Is KI safe for everybody?  Most people who take 1 dose of KI will have no side effects.  More doses of KI are only needed if a person has not been able to evacuate after 24 hours and officials inform that there is still concern of ongoing radioactive iodine exposure.  People who have iodine sensitivity should contact their doctor before taking KI. People with thyroid disorders should consult their physician and be treated cautiously, especially if taking KI for more than a few days.  Pregnant women should be given KI for their own protection and for that of the fetus only if exposure to radioactive iodine is imminent.  Pregnant women or women who are breast feeding should avoid taking more than one dose of KI.   
 
How will I know if I should take KI in an emergency?  Taking KI is only recommended in emergencies during which the public is likely to be exposed to radioactive iodine.  State and County health department officials will monitor the radiation emergency and will immediately notify the public to take KI if necessary.  The Westchester County Health Department will make immediate public announcements, notify the media, and broadcast emergency alert system messages.  Information will also be posted to the Internet at http://jic.semo.state.ny.us/.   Instructions to take additional doses or to stop taking KI will be widely publicized as well.
 
Where is KI available?  Free KI is available for people who live in the 10-mile radius of Indian Point, at their local Village Halls.  KI is also available over the counter in many pharmacies and it can be purchased on the Internet or in retail outlets without a prescription.  If reception centers are activated during a radiation emergency; these centers will also provide KI.  However, evacuation should not be delayed while trying to locate or purchase KI.   
 
What are the recommended doses of KI?  Consult the package label/insert for the correct dose for you and your family members.  Never take KI until officials recommend doing so, and never take more doses or more often than directed.  Taking more KI does not offer better protection and may result in a greater chance of side effects.  The recommended lowest effective doses of KI:  infants under two months of age – 0.3 ml liquid or 16 mg; two months through three years of age – 0.5 ml liquid or 32 mg; four years through twelve years of age – 1ml liquid or 65 mg; thirteen years through eighteen years of age and under 150 pounds – 1 ml liquid or 65mg; adolescents and adults weighing over 150 pounds, pregnant women and breastfeeding women – 130 mg tablet.   KI is available in 65 mg tablets, 130 mg tablets, and also in liquid form (65 mg/ml).   
 
If I am directed to take KI, what should I do if I only have 130 mg tablets?  If you are told to take KI, adults and children 12 years and older can take one 130 mg KI tablet.  Children less than 12 years of age can be given one half of the 130 mg tablet (which is 65 mg).  According to the FDA, “the overall benefit of taking 130 mg of KI (instead of 65 mg) to reduce long-term risk of thyroid cancer far exceeds the small risk from overdosing.”  One dose protects for up to 24 hours, which would be more than enough time to leave the affected area.  You will no longer need to take KI once you are outside the area of radioactive iodine exposure.  
 
Issued by the Westchester County Health DepartmentWeb site:
www.westchestergov.com/health
Updated August 2010

Meningitis Vaccine Requirement- Info from NYS

New for 2016-17 School Year

Parents:
All kids entering 7th and 12th grade must have the meningococcal vaccine.
Without it, they can’t start school.


About the Vaccine:

  • It’s not a new vaccine. It’s been recommended for a decade.
  • Most parents already choose to vaccinate their children.
  • What’s new is that the vaccine will be required for school entry as of Sept. 1, 2016.

About Meningococcal Disease:

  • It causes bacterial meningitis and other serious diseases.
  • Teens and young adults are at greater risk.
  • It comes on quickly and without warning.
  • Its symptoms are similar to the flu.
  • Every case of this disease can result in death or long-term disability.

Check with your doctor. Even kids who have had a shot before may need a booster to start school.


To learn more, visit
health.ny.gov/immunize
Immunization is Protection.
 
2169 2/16

 

Meningitis Vaccine Requirement- Letter to Parents

Dear Parents,
A recent change to NYS health law requires that as of September 1, 2016, all public and private school students entering 7th and 12th grades in New York State must be fully vaccinated against meningococcal disease in order to attend school.
The vaccine, sometimes called meningitis vaccine, targets the four most common types (A, C, W, and Y) of meningococcal disease in the U.S.  Two vaccines are available for administration:  Menactra and Menveo (also known as MCV4 or MenACWY).  Another meningococcal vaccine (Bexsero or Trumenba) which helps protect against type B is not required for school entry and cannot be used to fulfill the school entrance requirement.
Before school entry this September:

  • One dose of meningococcal vaccine (Menactra or Menveo) is required before 7th grade.  If your child has already had the first dose, then another is not required until 12th grade.
  • For most students, a total of 2 doses of meningococcal vaccine will be needed before 12th grade, with one dose required on or after the 16th birthday.   
  • The only teens who will need only one dose of meningococcal vaccine are those who got their first dose on or after their 16th birthday.  Those students who have received a second dose prior to their 16th birthday will still require an additional dose prior to entering 12th grade.

New York State law allows for medical and religious exemptions to school immunization requirements, including the meningococcal requirement.
Please supply the nurse in your child’s building with acceptable proof of immunization prior to the first day of school in September.


Proof of immunization is:

  1.  An immunization certificate, signed and stamped by your health care provider
  2.  A record issued by NYSIIS or CIR from NYC or an official immunization registry from another state or an official record from a foreign country
  3.  An electronic health record from your provider’s office

Thank you so much for your prompt attention to this very important matter.
 
        Kathy Brehm, RN at HGHS
        Lorie Miano, RN at Seven Bridges
        Pat Pollock, RN at Bell

 

When to keep your sick child home

At this time of year, many children (and adults) suffer from one or more of the many symptoms associated with the “common cold” and flu. These upper respiratory and gastrointestinal complaints leave many of us with the question, “How sick should my child be to stay home from school?” Although there is no concrete answer, there are some guidelines that may help you in the decision making process.

Please keep your child home if he/she has:

  • Fever--- A child needs to be fever-free for 24 hours (without medication) in order to return to school.
  • Severe Cough--- This pertains to a cough that is so severe that he/she is unable to attend to tasks or concentrate in the classroom.
  • Purulent (yellow or green) nasal discharge--- This may be indicative of an infection.
  • Communicable disease--- These conditions include the flu, staph and strep infections, impetigo, and conjunctivitis or pink eye.
  • Nausea and vomiting--- If your child has vomited during the night or in the early morning, your child should not come to school that day.
  • Fatigue--- Early bedtime is a must for young growing bodies. If a child has been ill, his/her resistance is low. By returning too early, your child will be exposing him/herself to other children’s germs as well as exposing other children and the staff. Please keep your child home if he/she is sick.

 Also, please reinforce preventive techniques at home. Frequent hand washing is the most important method of reducing cross contamination and preventing spread of infection. Also encourage children to cover their coughs and sneezes with tissues or, alternatively, encourage them to cough into the inside of their elbows. If your child is “iffy” and you decide to send him/her to school, please make sure that he/she knows where you will be and how to reach you. I hope you find these tips to be helpful.

Forms

High School

Seasonal Flu Guide

Keep your kids safe. Get their seasonal flu shots every fall or winter.

Is seasonal flu more serious for kids?
Infants and young children are at a greater risk for getting seriously ill from the flu. That’s why the New York State Department of Health recommends that all children 6 months and older get the seasonal flu vaccine.

Flu vaccine may save your child’s life.
Most people with seasonal flu are sick for about a week, and then they feel better. But, some people, especially young children, pregnant women, older people, and people with chronic health problems can get very sick. Some can even die. A flu vaccine is the best way to protect your child from seasonal flu.

What is seasonal flu?
The flu, or influenza, is a viral infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. The flu can spread from person to person.

Flu shot or nasal spray vaccine?

  • Flu shots can be given to children 6 months and older.
  • A nasal-spray vaccine can be given to healthy children 2 years and older.
  • Children younger than 5 years who have experienced wheezing in the past year – or any child with chronic health problems – should get the flu shot, not the nasal-spray vaccine.
  • Children younger than 9 years old who get a vaccine for the first time need two doses.

How else can I protect my child?

  • Get the seasonal flu vaccine for yourself.
  • Encourage your child’s close contacts to get seasonal flu vaccine, too. This is very important if your child is younger than 5 or if he or she has a chronic health problem such as asthma (breathing disease) or diabetes (high blood sugar levels).
  • Wash your hands often and cover your coughs and sneezes. This will prevent the spread of germs.
  • Tell your children to:
    • Stay away from people who are sick;
    • Clean their hands often;
    • Keep their hands away from their face, and
    • Cover coughs and sneezes to protect others. It’s best to use a tissue and quickly throw it away. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands.

What are signs of the flu?
The flu comes on suddenly. Most people with the flu feel very tired and have a high fever, headache, dry cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, and sore muscles. Some people, especially children, may also have stomach problems and diarrhea. The cough can last two or more weeks.

How does the flu spread?
People who have the flu usually cough, sneeze, and have a runny nose. The droplets in a cough, sneeze or runny nose contain the flu virus. Other people can get the flu by breathing in these droplets or by getting them in their nose or mouth.

How long can a sick person spread the flu to others?
Most healthy adults may be able to spread the flu from one day before getting sick to up to 5 days after getting sick. This can be longer in children and in people who don’t fight disease as well (people with weaker immune systems).

What should I use to clean hands?
Wash your children’s hands with soap and water. Wash them for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice. If soap and water are not handy, use wipes or gels with alcohol in them unless they are visibly soiled. The gels should be rubbed into hands until the hands are dry.

What can I do if my child gets sick?
Make sure your child gets plenty of rest and drinks lots of fluids. Talk with your child’s doctor before giving your child over-the-counter medicine. If your children or teenagers may have the flu, never give them aspirin or medicine that has aspirin in it. It could cause serious problems.

Can my child go to school/day care with the flu?
No. If your child has the flu, he or she should stay home to rest. This helps avoid giving the flu to other children.

When can my child go back to school/ day care after having the flu?
Children with the flu should be isolated in the home, away from other people. They should also stay home until they are symptom-free for 24 hours (that is, until they have no fever without the use of fever-control medicines and they feel well for 24 hours.) Remind your child to protect others by covering his or her mouth when coughing or sneezing. You may want to send your child to school with some tissues, wipes or gels with alcohol in them if the school allows gels.

For more information about the flu, visit
http://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/influenza/seasonal/
Or
www.cdc.gov/flu

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
State of New York
Department of Health


2423 10/10

When Your Child Needs Medication at School

Students may, at times, need medication at school. This may be on a regular daily basis or on an “as needed” basis. Medication, which is given during the school hours, must always be accompanied by a medical authorization form. The form is available in the Health Office and also can be downloaded from this site. It requires the signature of both a parent and the prescribing physician.

Medications need to be delivered to the Health Office by the parent and must be in the original pharmacy container. This applies both to prescription and over-the-counter medications.

Please call your student’s Health Office with any questions.

Concussion Management Policy

5032
Concussion Management Policy

Introduction
School athletic programs, intramural sports and physical education classes are an important part of the educational experience in the Chappaqua Central School District. It is paramount that the Board of Education insures that these experiences are as safe as possible for our student athletes. We recognize that mild traumatic brain injuries, also referred to as concussions, in young people can have long-term, substantial and devastating impacts. The District shall establish guidelines in an effort to protect our students and reduce the risk of long-term health complications.

Concussion Management Team
The District shall establish a Concussion Management Team consisting of the Director of Physical Education and Athletics, the School District's Medical Directors, a School Nurse, and the Athletic Trainer. The team shall oversee the implementation of any regulations approved by the Superintendent of Schools, including the training of staff, the provision of information to parents, and the utilization of technology, including baseline neurocognitive testing.

Removal from Athletic Activities
Any pupil believed to have sustained or who has sustained a traumatic brain injury will be immediately removed from athletic activities. If there is any doubt as to whether a student has sustained a concussion, it shall be presumed that he/she has until proven otherwise. No student shall resume athletic activity until he/she has been symptom free for at least 24 hours and has been evaluated by and received written and signed authorization from a licensed physician or licensed neurologist.

No student will be allowed to return to play on the same day of a concussion, regardless of the circumstances and shall be made aware that concussions may cause lifetime impairments. Student-athletes who have suffered from multiple concussions during a season will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Those with two (2) concussions will require additional rest and may be held out for the season. Those suffering three (3) concussions in a school year will be disqualified from participating in contact and collision sports until cleared by a neurologist.

For the safety of the student-athlete, the School District reserves the right under New York State Law to ban an athlete from competition regardless of medical clearance. Should a dispute arise the School Medical Directors have the authority to make the final decision on an athlete's return to play.

Training
On a biennial basis, all school coaches, physical education teachers, nurses and athletic trainers shall receive training on recognizing the symptoms of concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries, how such injuries may occur, how to prevent them, and how to implement the guidelines for a student's return to play. Coaches shall be required to meet with team members at the commencement of each season to discuss  the signs and symptoms of concussions and the importance of reporting any such symptoms immediately to the appropriate staff.

Concussion Information and Permission Forms
Head injury information, including return to school and school activities guidelines and the district's Return to Play guidelines, will be included in the interscholastic sports information and any permission forms given to students signing up for sports.

Adopted by Board of Education March 20,2012

Meningitis Vaccine Requirement- Info from NYS

New for 2016-17 School Year

Parents:
All kids entering 7th and 12th grade must have the meningococcal vaccine.
Without it, they can’t start school.


About the Vaccine:

  • It’s not a new vaccine. It’s been recommended for a decade.
  • Most parents already choose to vaccinate their children.
  • What’s new is that the vaccine will be required for school entry as of Sept. 1, 2016.

About Meningococcal Disease:

  • It causes bacterial meningitis and other serious diseases.
  • Teens and young adults are at greater risk.
  • It comes on quickly and without warning.
  • Its symptoms are similar to the flu.
  • Every case of this disease can result in death or long-term disability.

Check with your doctor. Even kids who have had a shot before may need a booster to start school.


To learn more, visit
health.ny.gov/immunize
Immunization is Protection.
 
2169 2/16

 

Meningitis Vaccine Requirement- Letter to Parents

Dear Parents,

A recent change to NYS health law requires that as of September 1, 2016, all public and private school students entering 7th and 12th grades in New York State must be fully vaccinated against meningococcal disease in order to attend school.

The vaccine, sometimes called meningitis vaccine, targets the four most common types (A, C, W, and Y) of meningococcal disease in the U.S.  Two vaccines are available for administration:  Menactra and Menveo (also known as MCV4 or MenACWY).  Another meningococcal vaccine (Bexsero or Trumenba) which helps protect against type B is not required for school entry and cannot be used to fulfill the school entrance requirement.
Before school entry this September:

  • One dose of meningococcal vaccine (Menactra or Menveo) is required before 7th grade.  If your child has already had the first dose, then another is not required until 12th grade.
  • For most students, a total of 2 doses of meningococcal vaccine will be needed before 12th grade, with one dose required on or after the 16th birthday.   
  • The only teens who will need only one dose of meningococcal vaccine are those who got their first dose on or after their 16th birthday.  Those students who have received a second dose prior to their 16th birthday will still require an additional dose prior to entering 12th grade.

New York State law allows for medical and religious exemptions to school immunization requirements, including the meningococcal requirement.
Please supply the nurse in your child’s building with acceptable proof of immunization prior to the first day of school in September.

Proof of immunization is:

  1.  An immunization certificate, signed and stamped by your health care provider
  2.  A record issued by NYSIIS or CIR from NYC or an official immunization registry from another state or an official record from a foreign country
  3.  An electronic health record from your provider’s office

Thank you so much for your prompt attention to this very important matter.
 
        Kathy Brehm, RN at HGHS
        Lorie Miano, RN at Seven Bridges
        Pat Pollock, RN at Bell

 

When to keep your Sick High Schooler Home

At this time of year, many children (and adults) suffer from one or more of the many symptoms associated with the “common cold” and flu. These upper respiratory and gastrointestinal complaints leave many of us with the question, “How sick should my child be to stay home from school?” Although there is no concrete answer, there are some guidelines that may help you in the decision making process.

Please keep your child home if he/she has:

  • Fever--- A child needs to be fever-free for 24 hours (without medication) in order to return to school.
  • Severe Cough--- This pertains to a cough that is so severe that he/she is unable to attend to tasks or concentrate in the classroom.
  • Purulent (yellow or green) nasal discharge--- This may be indicative of an infection.
  • Communicable disease--- These conditions include the flu, staph and strep infections, impetigo, and conjunctivitis or pink eye.
  • Nausea and vomiting--- If your child has vomited during the night or in the early morning, your child should not come to school that day.
  • Fatigue--- Early bedtime is a must for young growing bodies. If a child has been ill, his/her resistance is low. By returning too early, your child will be exposing him/herself to other children’s germs as well as exposing other children and the staff. Please keep your child home if he/she is sick.

 Also, please reinforce preventive techniques at home. Frequent hand washing is the most important method of reducing cross contamination and preventing spread of infection. Also encourage children to cover their coughs and sneezes with tissues or, alternatively, encourage them to cough into the inside of their elbows. If your child is “iffy” and you decide to send him/her to school, please make sure that he/she knows where you will be and how to reach you. I hope you find these tips to be helpful.

Forms

School Doctors' Updates

Pertussis Update from the District Medical Team:


Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a bacterial respiratory infection that initially resembles a typical viral cold. However, rather than improving, the illness progresses over 1-3 weeks to episodes of persistent and intense coughing. The disease may be particularly severe in infants. Like most respiratory infections, pertussis is spread through the air when an infected person coughs. Individuals are contagious from the onset of symptoms to up to 3 weeks after the coughing episodes begin. The diagnosis of pertussis is suspected based on symptoms and can be confirmed with a nasopharyngeal swab lab test.

Over the past few years there has been an increasing number of cases of pertussis, so that it is almost a certainty that the disease will be diagnosed in some of our district’s students and/or staff during the school year. Since mild disease is common, many more people will be infected but never diagnosed. The best way to protect yourself and your children from whooping cough infection is to teach and practice proper hygiene and ensure that your entire family has been adequately immunized. Check with your pediatrician or internist if you are unsure whether your immunization status is current or optimal.

Contact your doctor if you or your child exhibits symptoms suggestive of pertussis or are in close contact with someone diagnosed with pertussis. Treatment with antibiotics is effective in preventing the spread of infection and may possibly reduce the severity of symptoms. New York Health Department guidelines require that individuals with confirmed or suspected pertussis remain out of school until a 5-day course of an appropriate antibiotic has been completed.

As always, your school nurse is also an excellent resource for up to date health information.

Additional information is available from the following websites:
CDC
NYS Dept of Health
American Academy of Pediatrics

Health Related Links

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